Extreme snow sports wins and fails

Date: 2017-12-12 12:20:48

Golf’s biggest questions: Rickie Fowler’s major chances, Rory McIlroy’s return

Christmas is two weeks away, and the golf offseason has finally arrived … right in the middle of the 2017-18 PGA Tour season. I don’t really understand it, but I’m going to enjoy it because golf cranks up again just a few weeks after Christmas with the two-tournament Hawaii swing, and then we’re off on our nine-month journey. There is, of course, all kinds of intrigue going into the 2018 calendar year. There already was before Tiger Woods started swinging his driver like he was Tony Finau down in the Bahamas two weeks ago, and now that intrigue has been

OKC’s George: Pacers’ success brings ‘closure’

3:01 PM ET INDIANAPOLIS — As he returns to Indianapolis to play in the arena he called home for his first seven NBA seasons, Oklahoma City Thunder forward Paul George said Wednesday that he has regrets about how things ended with the Pacers. But he also has closure. “I think both sides — myself and the front office — would definitely like to have handled things better,” George said. “I for sure will take ownership on that. But I have no regrets on the outcome.” George declined to say specifically what those regrets are. “I know what I would’ve changed,”

When a golf course burns: How a club rose from the ashes to help revitalize the town around it

Rising from the ashes: How a golf club that burned to the ground helped revitalize the town around it | Golf.comlogo-golflogo-golfSI-icon-searchSI-icon-searchCloseDownDownDownDownDownDownlogo-golf Rising from the ashes: How a golf club that burned to the ground helped revitalize the town around it SOURCE: GoogleNews

Rising from the ashes: How a golf club that burned to the ground helped revitalize the town around it

Rising from the ashes: How a golf club that burned to the ground helped revitalize the town around it | Golf.comlogo-golflogo-golfSI-icon-searchSI-icon-searchCloseDownDownDownDownDownDownlogo-golf Rising from the ashes: How a golf club that burned to the ground helped revitalize the town around it SOURCE: GoogleNews

5 reasons why extreme sports on Mars will be out of this world

Date: 2017-12-12 20:30:00 5 reasons why extreme sports on Mars will be out of this world video 5 reasons why extreme sports on Mars will be out of this world all video 5 reasons why extreme sports on Mars will be out…

‘Don’t let him shoot it!’ Inside Harden’s terrifying trick

8:58 AM ET HOUSTON — “By yourself! By yourself!” Cleveland Cavaliers coach Ty Lue hollers from the bench after a ball screen set at the top of the arc prompts power forward Jeff Green to switch onto James Harden, the Houston Rockets superstar who considers seeing a bigger defender alone in space “probably one of the best feelings in the world.” The game got close for the Houston Rockets, but the greatness of James Harden and Chris Paul held up in Portland. Ryan Anderson was one point shy of matching his season high, while Chris Paul nearly had a triple-double

The downside of modernizing the Rules of Golf

For the better part of the last decade, officials at the USGA and R&A have offered a simple refrain to anyone professing difficulty understanding the nuances of the Rules of Golf. Be patient, they insisted. Relief is on the way. This promise, at last, is close to being fulfilled. In March, the governing bodies jointly revealed their first pass at a “modernized” Rules book that tackled several of the game’s most complex, confusing and confounding capstones. Having solicited feedback from the golf community, officials from the two groups are currently in the throes of crafting the final text (sources say

Superintendent seeks revenge at Sun City golf tournament

Each December, Sun City golfers take on one of the most fun and most challenging games of the year during the annual Superintendent’s Revenge. From maneuvering around giant inflatables to putting with a hockey stick, residents faced a new obstacle at every hole during the tournament held at Argent Lakes and Okatie Creek golf courses Dec. 5. The annual tournament, now in its sixth year, is an opportunity for residents to not only have fun, but to give back to the community as well. Each player brought at least one new, unwrapped toy or book donation for Bluffton Self Help.

LeBron praises Lonzo, sees first-year parallels

3:02 AM ET CLEVELAND — LeBron James sat in front of his locker Tuesday night following the Cavaliers‘ 123-114 win over the Atlanta Hawks, a game in which he tied his career high in assists with 17, but he wasn’t ready to talk about his team’s 15th victory in its past 16 games. A television stationed across the locker room from James showed the Los Angeles Lakers battling the New York Knicks in overtime. James was going to watch the finish to the Knicks’ 113-109 win over the Cavs’ next opponent — the Lakers and their lightning-rod rookie, Lonzo Ball

Lowe: Steph or KD? A fun question is about to get answers

Stephen Curry‘s ankle injury brings a challenge the Warriors haven’t faced for any extended period, save five games in the 2016 playoffs, since they became the Warriors: figuring out what exactly their team looks like without the two-time MVP.

“Of course I’m curious,” Bob Myers, the team’s GM, told ESPN.com. “I’m always curious. I was curious when Kevin [Durant] went down [last season]. But I’ve seen what our team looks like without Kevin. This will be new.”

With nothing new to say about the Warriors in Year 2 of Durant-Curry, league insiders and NBA Twitter die-hards have engaged in a barroom debate: Who’s better, or more important, to the Warriors — Durant or Curry?

On one level, it’s a stupid question. They are both transcendent. Why does one have to be more important?

But it’s a fun thought exercise with useful implications for team building. None other than Steve Kerr fueled it to some degree when he called Durant “the second-best player in the world” behind LeBron James during the Finals and then seemed to double down on that stance in a post-Finals edition of the Lowe Post podcast.

Durant is a better defender than Curry, and it is obviously not close. If both are all-world offensive players, logic suggests Durant’s defense makes him better.

But better and more important aren’t the same thing. And sometimes being more important can in effect make you better — at least in a particular team context.

Curry is a revolutionary NBA player. He makes shots that didn’t exist before, from angles and locations once considered impossible — in violation of basketball’s moral codes. Those shots are worth an extra point. He makes them almost half the time. Give most expert NBA 3-point shooters Curry’s exact shot distribution — off the dribble, 30 feet away, or body twisting to make a catch in the corner — and how many would they hit? Thirty percent? Worse? No one knows, because no one has dared try.

The Warriors saw that unprecedented skill set, and loosed it upon the league in increments — first under Mark Jackson (their 2013 playoff run, when they pushed the Spurs, is considered a watershed moment within the team), and then in a torrent when Curry and Kerr stretched it beyond imagination in 2015-16.

Curry’s singular shooting is the organizing principle for everything the Warriors have built. It is the electrical current powering the body — doing indispensable, foundational work even when you don’t see it.

“People took it the wrong way when we had our conversation after the Finals,” Kerr said of his podcast appearance. “I was talking specifically about two-way players, and Kevin is right there with LeBron and Kawhi [Leonard]. But does that mean he’s better than Steph? All that stuff is subjective. Who’s better: James Harden or Kawhi? I don’t know. But if you’re talking about who has the biggest impact on the way people guard us — on the identity of our team — then it’s Steph. He’s the engine. Everything starts with Steph.”

“What we built was initiated by Steph,” Myers added. “The offense starts with him.”

In the most literal sense, the Warriors look the way they do because of Curry. Teams trap Golden State’s pick-and-rolls 30 feet from the rim, unlocking shots for everyone else, because those pick-and-rolls involve the only human in history capable of hitting 40 percent of his off-the-dribble 3s from that distance. Draymond Green emerged as the team’s assist leader in part because he was Curry’s go-to pick-and-roll partner — and those traps sprang him for 4-on-3s that flummoxed the league for a full season.

Kerr instituted a more egalitarian offense, with everyone screening and cutting off the ball, because Curry understands the power he exercises screening and cutting off the ball. You can give most shooters, even the best ones, a brief, tiny window to put out another fire. You cannot give Curry any space, even if he is 25 feet away, has his back to the basket, or is in mid-collision while setting a pick. He’s too accurate, his wrist-snap release too fast.

If you’re guarding Curry and he nails your teammate with a pick that frees Klay Thompson, you can’t lunge away from Curry to blanket Thompson for a split second. Switch a bigger guy onto Curry, and he’ll keep moving until the behemoth can no longer keep up:

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